San Leandro Bay

December 08, 2014  •  Leave a Comment

I have been living in the Bay Area for a while now, and I keep hearing about this "San Francisco Bay Trail." I have walked and photographed a few sections of the Bay Trail in the past, but in the coming months, I am going to explore it much more intentionally. Many sections of the Bay Trail go through existing public parks, marinas and otherwise built-up places. But the most exciting parts for me are the areas that are set aside as nature preserves.

A couple of days ago, I visited San Leandro Bay, which is the bit in between Oakland, Alameda, and Bay Farm Island. The picture above is of Arrowhead Marsh. These intertidal wetlands are important breeding and feeding grounds for birds, amphibians, fish, insects, and even mamals. The non-native cordgrass that chokes this marsh prevents shorebirds from feeding.

This is a ring-billed gull. It can be very difficult to tell the different species of gulls apart, but I'm learning.


Berkeley Marina

November 15, 2014  •  Leave a Comment

It was a cold and overcast day at the Berkeley Marina, and I was in the mood for some experimental photography. I also love seeing the wildlife down by the bay.


Half Moon Bay

November 12, 2014  •  Leave a Comment

Here's a quick post from a recent trip to Half Moon Bay, California.


Meditations at the National Shrine of Saint Francis of Assisi

November 11, 2014  •  Leave a Comment

I dropped by the National Shrine of Saint Francis of Assisi in North Beach, San Francisco, California back in October. I am continuing with my Meditations series here, but I only took a few shots this time. I hope you enjoy.

"Meditations" is a series of abstract and impressionist photographs made in places of worship.


Double Exposure and More ICM

September 13, 2014  •  Leave a Comment

I posted these photos before, but I wanted to share them again by themselves. In this past year, I have begun to rediscover the joy of creating abstract and impressionist photographs.

I was creating double exposure and intentional camera movement images back in 2003, when I got into Lomography and toy cameras. Back then, I just thought of these techniques as Lomography, or maybe alt-photography. Ever since I switched to digital, I had somehow felt that I can't do this kind of photography anymore. I'm not sure why I felt that way. I guess that what I was looking for at the time was the element of serendipity that comes with Lomography. You go out, wave the camera around, and then see what you get when the film comes back from the lab.

But what you gain with digital is the ability to pre-visualize the photograph that you want to create. On a digital camera, you can check the screen on the back of the camera, decide if you like what you see, and then modify your technique and try again. With Lomography, I had to wait for the film to come back, and make do with whatever I got. With digital, I can keep trying until I get the image that I want.

Now, for me at least, the element of serendipity was one of the things that I liked about Lomography. But what I am discovering is that there is a whole world open to me now as an artist, that I had been ignoring until recently. It is undoubtedly fun to create abstract art accidentally, but to do it intentionally; to have a vision, and work to fulfil that vision, is so much more rewarding.

Stay tuned...

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